Frequently Asked Questions

Person-centred experiential therapy aims to promote personal growth and development. It is a talking therapy that enables client to develop their understanding of their problems. This is achieved by providing a non-judgemental, safe environment that is centred on trust and respect for our clients.

Person-centred experiential therapy aims to promote personal growth and development. It is a talking therapy that enables client to develop their understanding of their problems. This is achieved by providing a non-judgemental, safe environment that is centred on trust and respect for our clients.

The HFP is a FREE service. You will never be asked for a financial contribution towards your therapy.The HFP is a funded Co-operative Community Interest Company. Start-up funding was received via Cascade (a University of Nottingham Impact Campaign project).

You are not required to share all of your personal issues at your first session, nor should you. Very often, the beginning phase of therapy is about building a trusting therapeutic relationship in which you are free to share things at your own rate that feels comfortable for you. The therapist will do their best to help you to look at your issues and address those experiences. Talking about these things may take time, and will not necessarily all be included in one session.

We understand that not everyone is going to be a match for us and that this “therapist shopping” is often a normal part of the process. See who makes you feel the most safe and comfortable, as well as who seems to best understand and be equipped to help you move forward. The therapists should also provide a good standard of care for you, which includes being aware of their own training, experience and limitations and referring you on to other therapists when appropriate if you feel the therapist unable to assist you. Please feel free to empower yourself to ask your therapist questions and voice any concerns that you have about your treatment.

Confidentiality is an essential component to psychotherapy as part of building trust, and all of our client information is confidential. Client data are kept in password protected files on the computer, and in locked file cabinets in locked rooms. All data are stored by code number without personally identifying information. Data cannot be traced back to individual participants. However, confidentiality is not absolute, and there are exceptions. Sometimes, in the public interest, counsellors may need to make a referral to an agency or organisation (for example GP, police or social services) when there is a serious risk of imminent harm to their clients or to others, for example where a client is seriously mentally ill and needs hospitalisation, or in cases of child or elder abuse. These referrals are usually (but not always) made with the client’s knowledge and consent. This decision will depend on the particular circumstances of each client. You and your therapist should talk together in their first session and reach agreement about the limits of confidentiality for your work together. However, after discussion with your therapist, you should be clear about what information may need to be shared and with whom it may be shared.